made to stick cover

 

Since I’ve started here at Ydraw we have put in place a simple Script Writing Formula that we like to call the The Made to Stick Formula. I’ve gotten familiar with the Made to Stick method, the formula that makes an idea remembered. It is categorized in 6 principles.

  1. Simple
  2. Unexpected
  3. Concrete
  4. Credible 
  5. Emotional
  6. Stories

 

Each of these principles represents the methods to help stick your ideas in the heads of the consumers. Let’s look at each one individually.

Simple

What are the core elements of your message? There is a lot that goes into a company and a lot that goes into a product, but the audience doesn’t need all of that background knowledge. That’s the difficulty of having knowledge, thinking that everyone will be able to absorb what you know when they can’t. By adding too much information you can confuse the audience in what they are supposed to know. Find the core of your message and share that message with others. In doing so, you will motivate them to a decision.

Unexpected.

If there’s nothing to grab your audience, why would they remember your video? Try and pique the interest of your audience by introducing a mystery that they can’t wait to figure out. Humans like to think in patterns and to keep their attention all you need to do is break these patterns.

Concrete.

The easiest (and most quoted) example of this is Aesop’s fables of the concept of “sour grapes.” The Fox cannot reach some grapes and decides that they must be sour anyway. He wasn’t bitter over not getting what he wanted. But the term ‘sour grapes’ is a lot easier to say than ‘don’t be bitter from not getting what you want.’ Something becomes concrete when it can be described by the human senses.

Credible.

How do you look credible? Base your idea on authorities – experts, if you will. If you can’t do that you can use 5 other methods. An anti-authority (the dying smoker), Details of about your product, Statistics, Using the ‘Sinatra Test’ (“If I can make it there, I can make it anywhere” – the one test case that proves what you can do) and Testable Credentials (allows consumers to test it themselves).

Emotional.

I’m not suggesting that you should make your audience cry or anything, I’m suggesting you get them to care. For people to take action, they have to care. To do that focus on the individual, as Stalin once pointed out, “a single death is a tragedy, one million is a statistic”.  Association also works well by associating between something the audience doesn’t care about and something they do.

Stories.

What really makes an idea stick? Tell it as a story. Stories can reflect oneself in the minds of the audience and can go a long way to enter the long-term memory storage of an individual. There are three major types of stories to look for. The challenge plot (underdog, rags to riches), the connection plot (developing relationships that bridge the gap), and the creativity plot (somebody making a mental breakthrough or solving a long standing issue).

When following these six principles, your ideas can stick better in the brain of your target audience. But let’s see it in action, here’s a video we did for Atlas, an IT service management company.

How well did this video accomplish the 6 principles of ‘Made to Stick’?

 

Let’s go through them.

Simple. Atlas is the choice for your IT service management.

Unexpected. Using a monster truck as a metaphor for being stuck without knowing what to do with your IT services is something out of the blue and no one saw it coming.

Concrete. “We are your IT service management contact.” That is a concrete promise to the consumer. By using Atlas they won’t need to go any further to get their IT service management needs met.

Credible. At 1:15 the video talks about costumer satisfaction and shows a graph to show how they are improving on that concept. In the next scene they go over the benefits of using Atlas, cooperation through get together sessions, using webinar training and choosing ways to save money while increasing the user experience.

Emotional. There were a lot of emotions that are felt in that video. Worry and frustration, because the truck was stuck in the mud. The relief when Atlas came along and helped them out of the mess. Finally, gratitude, when they chose a better path and Atlas filled their gas tank and cleaned up their truck.

Story. If I worked in IT service management, I would certainly remember this story of how Atlas came to the aid and helped an ITSM company out of the mud and back on the right track.
There are so many great ideas out there that are just waiting for a story to tell the world about how amazing they are and how that idea can improve the lives and companies around the world.

I hope this little Made To Stick formula will help you create your next script. If you need a video, reach out to us. We would love to help craft the perfect script for you company.

Hey by the way, if you want to check out how to write a script the Made to Stick way, check out this guide on writing a script.

The Made to Stick Philosophy
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Jace Vernon

Jace Vernon

Business Owner, Speaker, and Consultant at Ydraw and Yinc Marketing
I was raised in a small farm town in Utah. Where my parents, gave me an excellent start in my life. We learned to work, and I acquired a lot of skills.

At age 19 I was shipped off to a little country in Central America called El Salvador. There I learned about sowing and reaping and picked up a few more skills that have helped me in business. Came home Graduated with a Masters Degree in Business. Got married and started my 2nd business. (my first being a window washing company.)

I would generate leads and customers by cold calling every morning, and I would often go out and knock doors to let people know about my service. It was a great time because I didn’t know any better. Nothing is more powerful than a young, ambitious, naive entrepreneur. I was worth about 6 million, but shortly after that, I was broke. Lost it all at age 28. It was then I realized I had messed up and needed some more education, some better ideas and ultimately a better philosophy.

The next year I spent hours at Barnes and Noble. I read 150 business books, which gave me more skills and a better life philosophy. I launched a couple of other companies, which one did about 4 million in just a couple of months. It was about that time when I came upon a Whiteboard Videos on Youtube.

The rest is history.

Online video marketing became my skill set.
Jace Vernon

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